Lifestyle

It's Not About How You Mess Up…


Hey guys!
Guess what? I have yet another post to share! Heads up before I launch in- this post is in response to a writing prompt I was given…
~What’s the most inspiring thing anyone has ever told you?~

“It’s not about how you mess up- it’s about how you recover.”

The first time I heard that (it was a couple ago years ago), I had just messed up a painting (of a horse, I believe). I wasn’t very happy… 
I remember my mom hugging me and saying that she loved in me. That, messing up didn’t have to be the end. She also challenged me to see what I could do to fix it. 
I can honestly say, I am a better painter now because of that. Not necessarily because my skill level boomed but because I can see past my errors to how I can fix them. In addition, the phrase inspired me to look at life differently, as well. 
Nobody’s perfect right? Yet we tend to be too hard on ourselves. Everyone knows that we’re our own worst critic. We criticise everything about ourselves, and I can’t help but wonder… do we criticise what we can actually change? Or what we think we can change?
We as people have a problem with ourselves in one way or another. Whether it’s our face, our body, our gender or our race- we want to change ourselves. But really out of those things mentioned, how many of them can you change, honestly? None! Maybe, your body in regards of losing weight to be healthier. But everything else? You have absolutely no power to change them, no matter how hard you try.
On the other hand, we as people will be rude and excuse it. We’ll be mean and give ourselves a pass. We’ll slack and let others down then get upset that they can’t empathize with us (teen life? Yeah). But those are things you can change, yet, we don’t for lack of will. 
It’s not wrong to be hard on yourself? Not when it comes to those things you can change. You should want to have character. You should want to be better. But it is wrong to seek perfection. No one will ever be perfect so all you’re doing is setting yourself up for failure and I’d hate to see you do that!
“It’s not about how you mess up…”
Every time we mess up it’s not a no-big-deal-shrug occurrence is it? I know for me it’s not. A lot of times you hurt yourself (ever stubbed your pinkie toe?) and sometimes you hurt others (ever accidentally hit someone with a paper ball?)… then we’re usually left feeling bad and ready to beat ourself up or throw a pity party.
“…It’s about how you recover.” 
But know this, every time you make an mistake, you have a chance to recover. Not the get up and brush yourself off like nothing happen kinda thing- but you have a chance to say “I’m sorry.” You have a chance to correct it and prevent it from happening again. And if you’re painting or drawing (or any other art I didn’t mention) you have a remedy for next time- or if you’re like me, you just know you’ll have to wing it every time. But whatever the case, recovery is always the next step.
So excatly how has this inspired me in lesser words?
It’s inspired me to focus on what I can change and accept what I can’t. Over time it has made me realize that- character isn’t about, rarely ever messing up. Or almost always having the right response or reaction. It’s about, knowing how to be humble enough to admit my fault and fix it. Whatever that make take, however that may be.
I hope that maybe this has inspired you too (it’d be cool to hear your take)!

0 thoughts on “It's Not About How You Mess Up…”

  1. Amazing post! This is a valuable lesson we all need to learn and put into action! That’s why I love the serenity prayer, because it reminds me to accept the things I cannot change (only God can change these!), have the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference! You have much wisdom for your age already Buttercup, and it’s because you are a wonderful child of God and you have wonderful parents surrendered to God and teaching you well! Love your writing! Thank you for sharing this with your readers!😀🤗

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